ORB COLOURS – Quest For Clarity

© 2020-2022, Orbicle Times™, “All Rights Reserved”

As some of you may know, I have an orb video/photo section on this webpage.  Images consist of orbs video and screenshots. All the images taken in my home consist of what I call spirit orbs, some other labels used in North America and perhaps in the West are ghost orbs, angel orbs, light balls, ETs, fairy and other identifiers.  If you read my review of the article called Paper Review: by Mara Steenhuisen, found under media reviews or here you can read how the name for this anomaly became a common identifier for many people.

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I am fascinated with the different colours of orbs and the possible meaning behind each of those colours.  If you are interested, you can see orb videos/photos or read what some colour theories might represent.

Up until now, I had only been acquainted with the typical browser results that one finds when searching for the meaning behind orb colours.  As an example, orbs colors are thought to signify certain characteristics, valence, traits, or temperament – all colour dependent.  Some believe that orb colours are indicative of different spiritual beings or entities. What do you think?

Many of those types of explanations have intrigued me but, in terms of mood/traits, never completely satisfied me due to the, what in my mind is, the shadowed source of such information – that is “source” with a small “s”. To clarify, I believe that the orbs that I have captured on video may be an intelligent spirit or entity because of their interactions with me. However, originator(s) of that type of orb information, and by type I mean, for the most part, the orb colour/color charts, are unknown to me. 

The various interpretations regarding orb colours/colors along with the word that often prefaces the given explanation on orbs, the word being “theories”, only makes me curious about when and where this information was established and who provided such theoretical descriptors.  If you know of this then please leave a comment or send me an email.  I would be appreciative of new information especially documented cases.

Like the blog I “inked” regarding Repeatedly Repeating Numbers, I need to explore where some theories originated.  Researching orb colours, either through podcasts, articles, blogs, I encounter closely related theories and colored charts outlining the corresponding colours with various attributes that are prescribed to orbs but no reference to the originator of all this information.

Current information on orb colours could leave one to think, or maybe just me, that orb colours and the meanings ascribed to them may have been around for eons but then I ask myself “how can this be”?  No matter what part of the world one is from, colourful language may have always existed but certainly not the language of colour.

‘ “There was a time when there were no color-names as such . . . and that not very remote in many cases, when the present color-words were terms that could be used in describing quite different qualities [including] gay, lively, smart, dashy, loud, gaudy . . . dull, dead, dreary . . . tarnished, stained, spotted, dirty, smeared . . . faint, faded [and feeble]”’ (Gizmodo).

When there were no names for colours, how then could a colour chart for orbs even exist?  With that information I am going to go out on a limb and say it did not, which then narrows down the time period of its’ creation – I think.

Obviously colors, like gravity, have been around for “eons” however, the categorizations for each have not.  Initially, descriptive words were used, as an example; the color black originally meant blazing, burnings and was thought to be pronounced bhleg (Gizmodo).

The Wobes from Cote d’Ivoire apparently have only one word for the three colours; brown, blue and purple.  Not all languages have the same basic color categories. English has 11 terms but Wobe only has three, which translate into dark, light and red (Vox).  There are definitely more than three colours on the above-mentioned orb color charts.

Also, depending on what part of the planet one is from, names denoting colour will be different and so will the meanings attributed to the different colours/colors.  As an example, red symbolizes good luck in China, for the Celtics it symbolizes death and afterlife, in India it is purity and in North America – love, passion and danger. 

This leads me to believe that the orb colour/color chart(s) is not universal; mind you, I never heard that it was, or that is was not. How then does one use such a chart if one lives within a culture where colours denote a different type of symbolisms/attributes than what is listed on said chart? 

Perhaps there are translations and slightly different interpretations of charts in other countries.   I hope so; it might be interesting to have two people with different symbolic colour/color beliefs in a photo together which has a coloured/colored orb in it. How then would the orb’s colour be interpreted, if one was so inclined.

Well, it seems that I am not much closer to answering my original query however, I have come across a book, which discusses orb colors, and the spirits that “wear” them and the different spiritual levels that accompany those colour garments.  I will do a review of that book after I complete it. I hope that the contents of the book and thus my next review will encapsulates the true essences of the meaning behind a finger pointing towards the moon. “I am a finger pointing to the moon. Don’t look at me; look at the moon.” Buddha

Take care,

Kelly-Jo

© 2021, 2022 Orbicle Times/Kelly-Jo, “All Rights Reserved”

Reference:

Melissa-TodayIFoundOut.com, How The Colors Got Their Names, January,28,2014

https://gizmodo.com/how-the-colors-got-their-names-1510522700

Haubursin, Christophe; The surprising pattern behind color names around the world

Why so many languages invented words for colors in the same order.

Vox, May 16, 2017, 6:50pm EDT

https://www.vox.com/videos/2017/5/16/15646500/color-pattern-language

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